Archive for February, 2017

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Waste and Race Matter: Current Issues In Environmental Justice

As residents of the wealthiest country on the planet, having clean air, water, access to food and living free of harmful toxins shouldn’t be a privilege, it should be a right. Unfortunately, communities of color continue to bear the burden of environmental racism and neglect. Like our last post on How Transportation Shaped Black Communities, I am listing articles that feature communities suffering at the hands of environmental injustice. While administrations and policies change, it is important to remember that there are humans caught in the cross hairs of politics and willful neglect. It is up to each of us to share their stories, advocate with them, and work to combat environmental racism.

These select articles do not do justice to an issue that pervades marginalized communities; however, they do provide some context to issues that too many communities face.  Unfortunately, race matters when it comes to waste. We must advocate for regulations, more stringent policies, enforcement and cleaner technologies until environmental racism is eradicated.

Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC an environmental consulting, urban planning and public engagement firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.

 

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How Transportation Shaped Black Communities

Transportation is a tool that can be used for the good of the community or the good of one community over another. It can be the glue that holds everything together or be like a knife that divides.  It can be the center of life, culture, and entertainment. It can also be a place where dreams are deferred. For this Black History Month post, I put together a list of some articles, websites, and critical reads on how transportation has shaped black communities for good and for bad.

Thriving Corridors of Life and Culture

U Street NW in the District of Columbia: U Street NW was once a thriving cultural corridor with Black entertainers such as Duke Ellington. Today, his name is used for names of apartment buildings. Here is a list of articles and books about U Street.

Greenwood, Oklahoma: In the early part of the 1900s, Greenwood was dubbed “Black Wall Street”. There were thriving businesses and culture. In 1921 it was all destroyed by the Klu Klux Klan.

Sweet Auburn, Atlanta


Transportation that Divides

Cross Bronx Expressway: Most urban/transportation planners know the name Robert Moses. He was “visionary” behind the highway. Constructing the highway displaced thousands of families and divided the Bronx.

Public Transportation and Highways

Veronica O. Davis, PE is a transportation guru who uses her knowledge to spark progressive social change. As Co-owner and Principal of Nspiregreen, she is also responsible for the management of the major urban planning functions such as transportation planning, policy development, master planning, sustainability analysis, and long range planning. In July 2012, Veronica was recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House for her professional accomplishments and community advocacy, which includes co-founding Black Women Bike.

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Planning and the Black Community

Ever since I was a little girl, I loved reading. In fourth grade, I read over 100 books during the school year for fun. For Black History Month, I’m sharing some books I’ve read related to planning and the Black community.

Do you have any suggested reads?

Veronica O. Davis, PE is a transportation guru who uses her knowledge to spark progressive social change. As Co-owner and Principal of Nspiregreen, she is also responsible for the management of the major urban planning functions such as transportation planning, policy development, master planning, sustainability analysis, and long range planning. In July 2012, Veronica was recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House for her professional accomplishments and community advocacy, which includes co-founding Black Women Bike.





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