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US Government Works

Just Leave It In the Past!

My grandmother used to tell me, “Some things just need to stay in the past.” As I have gotten older, I tend to agree with her.

Rolling back and weakening environmental regulations that protect human health and the environment shouldn’t become the norm; yet, over the past year, we have become bombarded with changes or threats to regulations in the name of business profits and/or potential job creation. Practices that further exacerbate health issues and pollute our environment should remain in the past. As a former facilities engineer and current business owner, I completely understand how regulations can increase operating costs for businesses. While in some cases profit margins may take a hit, health risks decrease, and the quality of life increases when we are good stewards of our environment.

US Government Works

US Government Works

Environmental protections were put in place because all businesses don’t operate with the protection of air, water, land, and people at the center of their operations. The United States of America is one of the world’s most developed nations and should be leading the pack when it comes to yielding new technologies that minimize pollution; but, for some reason, we are looking towards the past instead of the future.

Certainly, we don’t want to revisit a past where we witness places like Love Canal, which helped start the SuperFund Site program or incidents like the Cuyahoga River fire which was the catalyst for the Clean Water Act.

Over the past months, I’ve seen a number of headlines that caught my attention regarding the repeal or weakening of regulations related to asbestos, fuel economy standards, clean energy, and climate change. I could go on, but I won’t.

This is certainly not the path that we should take. I believe that we are better than this and we have to advocate for better policies while moving forward to reduce pollution, mitigate the impacts of climate change, and do our best to protect human health despite anyone enforcing us into good business. The health of our people and our precious resources have to take precedence over our profits.


Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC a community, multimodal, and environmental planning firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.

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TEAM BUILDING: Anacostia River Boat Tour

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On July 26, the Nspiregreen team went on the Anacostia Watershed Society’s Anacostia Boat Tour as part of this quarter’s team building. This trip gave us a chance to see first-hand and learn more about the efforts being implemented to improve the health of the river. This was a great experience especially since we have been working on some projects related to the Anacostia River’s cleanup efforts.

The Anacostia River watershed is home to 43 species of fish, some 200 species of birds, and more than 800,000 people. The river flows through Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties in Maryland and past the Capitol Building in the District. The watershed is approximately 176 square miles and around 25% of its land lies in the District of Columbia. (Source: DOEE, February 15, 2018, EPA)

The Anacostia has been polluted by litter, raw sewage, stormwater runoff, and industrial waste since the 19th Century. However, in the past two decades efforts have been implemented to turn “The Forgotten River” into a “fishable and swimmable” water body as defined by the Clean Water Act. For example, the recently opened DC Water tunnel between the RFK Stadium and the Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant is preventing millions of gallons of wastewater from entering the river, thus reducing the levels of bacteria. The District’s Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) launched the “For a Cleaner Anacostia River” initiative aimed to clean the river sediments contaminated with industrial toxins including polychlorinated biphenyl’s (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs).

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Tour Highlights

Below are some highlights of our trip!

Rain, Rain, Rain…

There was a thunderstorm the night before the tour. In fact, this past July was one of the wettest Julys on record! The day we went, the river was yellow-colored and full of broken branches and litter. However, boats were out removing these items. Here is a picture of one of DC Water’s boats cleaning up litter.skimmerboat
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Due to the high levels of precipitation, the river’s water level was really high. For this reason, we were not able to go under the Benning Rd bridge. The water was almost hitting the rail bridge! I heard the area north of this bridge has beautiful scenery and lots of wildlife. We will come back again!

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The River is Improving

The water condition is getting better; wildlife and the levels of subaquatic vegetation have increased. The tour guide also told us that they are testing the use of mussels to clean the water. Fun fact an adult mussel can naturally filter about 10 gallons of water a day!

Bird Nest

 

You Can Also Tour the Anacostia River!

If you want to tour the Anacostia, the Anacostia Watershed Society and the Anacostia Riverkeeper offer guided motorboat and canoe tours free of charge. These tours are funded by the District’s disposable bag fee program.  Tours leave from various locations.

What to bring:

  • Reusable water bottle filled with water (plastic water bottles are not allowed on the boat for environmental protection)
  • Sunscreen
  • Hat and sunglasses

 

To learn more, visit https://doee.dc.gov/service/anacostia-river-explorers

 

Mei Fang, is an urban planner with a strong passion for urban and landscape design, she also enjoys looking for the variety culture inside of the city.

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The Future of Transportation – Part III

As an alumnus and a member of the Advisory Council for the Civil Engineering Department at Cornell University, I was asked to lead a workshop during the summer CURIE Academy at Cornell’s main campus. The purpose of the summer program was to inspire young women in high school to consider a future in engineering and at Cornell University. The students were exposed to engineering through a series of workshops and exhibitions. My workshop entitled “Transportation: How you can be part of the Future” included a presentation and a group activity.

 Last summer, I gave a presentation on the future of transportation to high school students in Cornell’s CATALYT Program. It was followed by a group activity, which included some ideas that blew me away. This summer I gave an updated version of the presentation that included a new group activity. Last summer, I had the students design a transportation system of the future with no constraints to geography. For this year’s activity, the students worked in twelve teams of four to design Cornell’s Campus of the Future with a focus on mobility options. While designing the campus, the students were required take into consideration populations that are historically ignored when public spaces are created: persons with disabilities, students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, and international/non-native English speaking students.

The highlights of the workshop are:

  • The young women were shocked at the idea that people can have access to a car without owning a car. Of all my slides, we spent 20 minutes on a slide about car sharing programs such as Zipcar, Car2Go, and Getaround. The students asked me how the program works, the technology behind the programs, and what is being done with the data. One young woman suggested using the data in transportation models to get a better sense of how people move. (Did I mention these are high school students?). The biggest discussion was around the need to own a car and the impact on communities. They were excited about the idea that carsharing reduces the number of cars people owned, but they were concerned carsharing doesn’t do enough to reduce congestion. They also wondered if it was practical to do a carshare program with electric vehicles to reduce the air emissions.
  • Presenting as a team. While my instructions were to select a representative to present the ideas on behalf of the team, every single group presented as a team. They made sure everyone had a speaking role. One team told me, “we worked as a team, so we will present as a team”.
  • Cornell should consider e-bikes. Of the twelve groups, almost all of them included e-bikes in their campus of the future. They noticed that people bike around Cornell’s campus. However, they were also aware of the steep hills. (True story: I walked up E. Seneca Street exactly one time during my 2.5 years at Cornell. I almost died trying to get to the top). The students believed that having e-bikes allows people to have a sustainable and reliable form of transportation, while also having an electric motor assistance to get up the hills. Since e-bikes can be expenseive, they recommended an e-bike sharing program to ensure affordability for all students. One group wanted to see an autonomous e-bike sharing program to help students with disabilities be able to move around the campus.
  • When you can’t fix the weather go underground. Ithaca, NY gets cold and it snows. About half of the groups took this into consideration when designing their future transportation system. They recommended some form of underground transportation. Some recommended an underground subway or hyperloop. Some kept it simple and recommended underground tunnels for people to walk, bike, or use a mobility device such as a wheelchair. (For the record, I would’ve appreciated any of these options as a student).
  • Teleportation from a watch? I didn’t put any limits on their creativity. One team decided that by 2058, students would be able to teleport to their desired location on campus by punching in the coordinates. It sparked some interesting questions from their peers around the practicality and the science behind teleportation.

The more I work with young people, I’m confident the engineering profession is going to be in good hands. They are compassionate, idealistic, collaborative, inquisitive, and super smart. Yes, I’m going to hire all 48 of them (I wish!).

Photo of a classroom at Cornell University with 48 participants in the CURIE Academy

Photo of some of the participants in the CURIE Academy

Veronica O. Davis, PE is a transportation guru who uses her knowledge to spark progressive social change. As Co-owner and Principal of Nspiregreen, she is also responsible for the management of the major urban planning functions such as transportation planning, policy development, master planning, sustainability analysis, and long range planning. In July 2012, Veronica was recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House for her professional accomplishments and community advocacy, which includes co-founding Black Women Bike.





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