2013-01-05_16-09-19_467

How to Bike for Transportation

With the upcoming year of SafeTrack, you may be scrambling to figure out how you are going to get to work. As you are going through your options, did you consider biking to work?

Before I give tips, I must confess I don’t bike to work regularly. About two years ago, I biked to work 3-4 times a week, except rain and hot summer days. Then, I moved close to a metro station, so I started taking metro to work which then became my time to read. In addition, until a few months ago, there was nowhere to lock my bike at work. However, I do bike on the weekends regularly. I say all of this because I know how hard it is to bike to work. It’s so much to think about, but I’m here to demystify some of it for you.

  1. Decide what bike to ride: You could use your personal bike, borrow a bike, or use Capital Bikeshare. If using a personal or borrowed bike, make sure to check your brakes and make sure you have adequate air pressure in your tires. Whatever you decide, you can change day-to-day. You can use your personal bike one day and Capital Bikeshare another day.
  2. Figure out where you will store your bike for the day: This is the most important step for me, because I do not like biking places where I can’t lock my bike securely or bring it inside. Check out the scene at your office. Are there biking racks in the parking garage or is there a bike room? If there is a bike room, do you have to fill out paperwork to get access? Will your boss allow you to bring your bike in the office? If you use Capital Bikeshare, where is nearest station?
  3. Plan your route and try it on the weekend: When I first started biking, it took a while to transition my brain from the best route for driving to the best route for biking. When biking, sometimes the best route may be a neighborhood street that has low traffic volumes or cutting through a park. Whatever the route, grab a friend or two and try it out on the weekend when you aren’t pressed for time or stressed about getting to the office for a meeting.
  4. Plan your outfit and pack your bags the night before: Some people bike in work clothes and others shower/change at work. Personally, I don’t like biking in the summer because I don’t like being sweaty and showering in a public shower. However, with SafeTrack, there may be days that I bike then shower and change at the office. Regardless of which camp you decide to join, packing and planning the night before saves time and reduces stress. If there is no shower in your building, you can try paper showers or baby wipes and some strong deodorant. You could also join a gym near your office for the purposes of showering (Don’t laugh. I’ve seen it done before).
  5. Bike to work: You’ve completed Steps 1-4 and now you are ready to bike to work.

Simple right? Well I know you have a bunch of other concerns (*cough* excuses *cough). I’m going to tell you something that many others may not tell you.

  • Biking to work doesn’t mean you have to bike home: You could bike to work and then bring your bike on bus or metro to go home. Check out WMATA’s rules on bringing your bike on public transportation.
  • Biking to work doesn’t mean you have to bike the entire way to work: You could bike to the bus. You could bike to a metro station that isn’t being impacted by SafeTrack. You could bike to a carpool. You could carpool to a bikeshare station. You could… The options are endless.
  • Biking to work doesn’t mean you have to do it in all weather conditions: I admire my rain, sleet, snow, and heat biking friends. I do not bike in when liquid is coming from the sky or heat.
  • Biking to work doesn’t mean you have to do it every day: You can bike as many days as you want.

Give biking to work a try. If you need more resources, check out the Washington Area Bicyclist Association for tips on surviving SafeTrack.

 

Veronica O. Davis, PE is a transportation guru who uses her knowledge to spark progressive social change. As Co-owner and Principal of Nspiregreen, she is also responsible for the management of the major urban planning functions such as transportation planning, policy development, master planning, sustainability analysis, and long range planning. In July 2012, Veronica was recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House for her professional accomplishments and community advocacy, which includes co-founding Black Women Bike.





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