Posts Tagged ‘climate change’

IMG_0733

Some Thoughts After Traveling to Iceland (Climate Change and Geothermal Energy)

In the past few years, Iceland has become one of the most popular travel destinations in the world. So last Thanksgiving, I went to Iceland to see what the big fuss was all about. One of the many tourists draws of Iceland in winter is the promise of venturing off-the-beaten-path to remote, wild, snowy fields. The landscape was filled with wild horses and sheep. You can also find glacial lagoons and geysers erupting as you trek across the country.  After traveling there, my advice is to do yourself a favor by soaking in the Blue Lagoon and enjoy a facial mask. And make sure you view the Northern Lights in the dark!

IMG_0733IMG_3437IMG_0540

Some of the scenes in Game of Thrones (GOT) were filmed in Iceland. One of the scenes of John Snow walking on a glacier, shown in the following pictures, was filmed in Vatnajökull National Park. Another fun fact is that Iceland’s water smells like sulfur almost everywhere on this Island.

95c66695b1d58b1ae050c3be052dcbd2d9288641f8b716cf5daa99c5b65a0d4f

https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/21/16177632/game-of-thrones-season-7-episode-6-recap-fantasy-league

46DD5D2200000578-0-image-a-23_1512122324002

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2017/12/01/09/46DD5D2200000578-0-image-a-23_1512122324002.jpg

It is Iceland’s natural beauty that attracts the tourists, but that natural beauty is now threatened by climate change. According to our tour guide, this Vatnajökull  glacier (the biggest glacier in the country) is melting approximately 100 meters (320 ft.) per year, causing sea levels near Iceland to rise. Reports from the Icelandic Government’s Committee on Climate Change (IGCCC) claim that if we don’t do anything to help reduce climate change, Iceland’s glaciers will no longer exist by the next century. During an ice cave tour, the guide told us it is harder and harder to find good ice caves to even see, because melting ice makes the water flowing beneath them very unstable.
LRG_DSC07025

 

I would say Iceland is a place on earth that doesn’t look like earth. There are about 130 volcanoes on the island–30 of them.  Even though we call it Iceland, it actually more like Fireland or Hotland. Iceland lies in the crack in the Earth’s crust where the North American tectonic plate and Eurasian tectonic plate meet, so while the Earth’s crust slowly tears apart, energy releases—giving Iceland its vast geothermal energy resources. Once scientists discovered this in 1970s, Iceland started capitalizing on this energy resource. According to Ásgeir Margeirsson, CEO of Geysir Green Energy, Iceland citizen save four times cost for heating.

GetAsset

https://www.icelandontheweb.com/articles-on-iceland/nature/geology/geothermal-heat

header_jardhiti

http://www.nea.is/geothermal/

Iceland is a pioneer in using geothermal energy all over the world. The country’s geothermal resources come from the dynamic volcano, and several major geothermal power plants produce around 30% of the country’s electricity. One of the most popular places in Iceland is the Blue Lagoon. This is the world biggest man-made lagoon, which is fed by nearby geothermal power, and renew every two days. Superheated water is vented from the ground near a lava flow, and used to run turbines that generate electricity.

IMG_0846IMG_3428

There is a lot to learn from Iceland when it comes to adopting clean and alternative energy. Companies such as Tesla . There are many solar energy companies that are taking the lead in powering our homes and automobiles using a cleaner form of energy. Once alternative energy options, such as home solar panels, can be mass-produced cheaply, more people will be inclined to adopt these new technologies. Until then, we can help to fight climate change by eliminating our carbon footprint and choose using green energy.

Mei Fang, is an urban planner with a strong passion for urban and landscape design, she also enjoys looking for the variety culture inside of the city.

Department of Defense

Houston, No America, We Have A Problem!

Department of Defense
Department of Defense

 Unless you have been living under a rock, you have seen the news and know the devastation Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath has caused in Southeast Texas. When we witness such tragedy on a large scale, we immediately begin discussing ways to prevent it; however, flooding is an everyday occurrence in many cities across the United States. While this flooding in the human environment may not be enough to blanket a city or trap people in their homes, it’s enough to destroy property; cause waterborne illnesses; cause loss of life; destroy crops; and impede access to essential public services such as ambulances and firetrucks. The aforementioned list is by no means exhaustive but a snippet to illustrate some of the impacts of flooding. Sadly, it doesn’t take a hurricane to have this impact. Heavy rainfall or even sustained rainfall over a long period of time can be just as destructive.

Unfortunately, climate change is causing more frequent and extreme weather events. Unless we take action to mitigate the damage caused by these wet weather events, we will see more devastation in our communities. As an environmental engineer who happens to work on stormwater management issues, here are a few of my thoughts on the topic.

1. Preservation of natural resources – Wetlands (marshes, swamps, bogs, ponds) are land areas covered by water that consist of plant and animal life. In the context of flood control, wetlands help protect against storm surges by serving as an intermediary between larger waterbodies and land. Unfortunately, development often destroys this natural barrier allowing more water to reach land and without filtration. Jurisdictions should include preservation of natural resources as they update their land use plans, comprehensive plans, and/or zoning laws.

2. Getting smarter about growth – During wet weather events, water is looking for a place to go. Water naturally seeps into the ground; however, many of our cities are covered in asphalt, concrete, and other impenetrable barriers. This surface water runoff can overwhelm our sewers and become stuck in areas where there is little flow. In addition, waterfronts are being developed with housing and commercial space without regards to rising water levels due to climate change. As this land erodes it will impact these places that are now high value corridors of living and entertainment. Despite these challenges, waterfronts are and will continue to be popular locations for development. Developments should consider sea level rise or consider new design techniques such as floodable buildings.

3. Increase in green infrastructure -Trees, rain gardens, green roofs, bio swales, pervious pavement, rain barrels and constructed wetlands are a newer approach to managing surface water runoff. Many urban areas are using green infrastructure as a tool to imitate the natural process that should occur after wet weather events by adding soils and other vegetation back into the ecosystem. Green infrastructure has to be a part of a larger strategy to effectively minimize the impact of wet weather as well as place making in communities.

4. Increase and maintain gray infrastructure – Poor drainage, lack of maintenance, infrastructure not designed for high density populations are all issues impacting our existing gray infrastructure such as storm drains, storm sewers, holding tanks, dams and levees. In fact, both dams and levees received a grade D on the American Society of Civil Engineers 2017 Infrastructure Report Card. New gray infrastructure as well as the maintenance of older infrastructure are important components in preventing the outcomes we often witness in wet weather events.

The damage and destruction that we witnessed post Katrina, Sandy and now Harvey are not isolated to these extreme wet weather events. Until we extend our conversations and more importantly our action to maintenance and prevention, we will continue to play Monday morning quarterback. Unfortunately, it’s more than a football game at stake. Lives depend on it. America, we have a problem!

P.S. Extreme wet weather events are occurring globally but for the purposes of  making this blog brief, I limited the issue to the United States of America.

Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC an environmental consulting, urban planning and public engagement firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.

world-water-day

The Thirst Is Real

world-water-day

A water drop. Copyright: Michael Melgar, license: GNU FDL

After a long day at work, a good workout at the gym, or just a walk in the sizzling summer sun our personal need for water is even greater. Imagine turning on the faucet and tap-tap there is nothing there or that water coming from the faucet isn’t safe to drink. There is no bottled water to get you by, no water fountain to fill the gap. Water, like the air we breathe, is a precious natural resource. It is necessary to sustain life and, although it covers much of the earth, is also in short supply for those that need it most. According to a United Nations Report, 783 million people lack access to clean water and almost 2.5 billion do not have access to adequate sanitation. Take a second to imagine that situation: no water to drink, bathe in, cook with, or use for luxury purposes like washing the car or watering the lawn. Water quality and quantity are a global challenge.

Water issues are everywhere. Even in a country like the United States, where we seem to take water for granted, there are people who lack access to clean water due to lack of infrastructure and pollution. These issues are even more pervasive in developing nations and areas where there are population explosions. The already inadequate infrastructure cannot keep up with the demands on the system. Water pollution abounds from agricultural, human, and industrial sources. We have seen these examples in communities in Michigan, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas to name a few. In addition to water quality, climate change adds to an ever-increasing water scarcity by causing water to evaporate more quickly.

Human thirst for water is real and so must be the solutions to combat this crisis. Because there is a limited supply, we must focus on having clean sources of water. No one should lack access to clean water. There are actions that we can take individually such as conserving water and reducing our own pollution; but, there are other actions that take a collective broader approach. These actions can include:

  • finding ways to decrease agricultural runoff to reduce sediment, bacteria, fertilizers, and pesticides in waterways;
  • water reuse such as gray water systems;
  • combatting climate change to deal with scarcity issues;
  • using pollution prevention methods and technologies to decrease contamination from industrial sources;
  • sustainable development, which includes low impact development and green infrastructure;
  • and building infrastructure in new places as well as rebuilding crumbling infrastructure.

Until we stand firm and act, hold our representatives responsible, and advocate for clean water at all levels of government, we will witness the devastating consequences of clean water scarcity including disease and death of millions of humans as well as fish and wildlife, rampant hunger, and incidents that impact our security. A few weeks ago, we celebrated World Water Day but our commitment to preserving this natural resource should be daily.


Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC an environmental consulting, urban planning and public engagement firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.





BEGIN NOW

TELL US ABOUT YOUR UPCOMING PROJECT!



We would love to help you with your sustainability goals.
GET STARTED