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Some Thoughts After Traveling to Iceland (Climate Change and Geothermal Energy)

In the past few years, Iceland has become one of the most popular travel destinations in the world. So last Thanksgiving, I went to Iceland to see what the big fuss was all about. One of the many tourists draws of Iceland in winter is the promise of venturing off-the-beaten-path to remote, wild, snowy fields. The landscape was filled with wild horses and sheep. You can also find glacial lagoons and geysers erupting as you trek across the country.  After traveling there, my advice is to do yourself a favor by soaking in the Blue Lagoon and enjoy a facial mask. And make sure you view the Northern Lights in the dark!

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Some of the scenes in Game of Thrones (GOT) were filmed in Iceland. One of the scenes of John Snow walking on a glacier, shown in the following pictures, was filmed in Vatnajökull National Park. Another fun fact is that Iceland’s water smells like sulfur almost everywhere on this Island.

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https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/21/16177632/game-of-thrones-season-7-episode-6-recap-fantasy-league

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http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2017/12/01/09/46DD5D2200000578-0-image-a-23_1512122324002.jpg

It is Iceland’s natural beauty that attracts the tourists, but that natural beauty is now threatened by climate change. According to our tour guide, this Vatnajökull  glacier (the biggest glacier in the country) is melting approximately 100 meters (320 ft.) per year, causing sea levels near Iceland to rise. Reports from the Icelandic Government’s Committee on Climate Change (IGCCC) claim that if we don’t do anything to help reduce climate change, Iceland’s glaciers will no longer exist by the next century. During an ice cave tour, the guide told us it is harder and harder to find good ice caves to even see, because melting ice makes the water flowing beneath them very unstable.
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I would say Iceland is a place on earth that doesn’t look like earth. There are about 130 volcanoes on the island–30 of them.  Even though we call it Iceland, it actually more like Fireland or Hotland. Iceland lies in the crack in the Earth’s crust where the North American tectonic plate and Eurasian tectonic plate meet, so while the Earth’s crust slowly tears apart, energy releases—giving Iceland its vast geothermal energy resources. Once scientists discovered this in 1970s, Iceland started capitalizing on this energy resource. According to Ásgeir Margeirsson, CEO of Geysir Green Energy, Iceland citizen save four times cost for heating.

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https://www.icelandontheweb.com/articles-on-iceland/nature/geology/geothermal-heat

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http://www.nea.is/geothermal/

Iceland is a pioneer in using geothermal energy all over the world. The country’s geothermal resources come from the dynamic volcano, and several major geothermal power plants produce around 30% of the country’s electricity. One of the most popular places in Iceland is the Blue Lagoon. This is the world biggest man-made lagoon, which is fed by nearby geothermal power, and renew every two days. Superheated water is vented from the ground near a lava flow, and used to run turbines that generate electricity.

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There is a lot to learn from Iceland when it comes to adopting clean and alternative energy. Companies such as Tesla . There are many solar energy companies that are taking the lead in powering our homes and automobiles using a cleaner form of energy. Once alternative energy options, such as home solar panels, can be mass-produced cheaply, more people will be inclined to adopt these new technologies. Until then, we can help to fight climate change by eliminating our carbon footprint and choose using green energy.

Mei Fang, is an urban planner with a strong passion for urban and landscape design, she also enjoys looking for the variety culture inside of the city.

Image from the TV show Game of Thrones with Milesandre, the red witch, looking into fire with the caption "The internet is dark and full of spoilers"

Thronesian Livability

Note: Please note there are spoilers here from Game of Thrones season 7, so if you aren’t caught up by now, beware! Also note that this information is solely based on the HBO show and not the books.

In the game of thrones, you win or you die… but what’s the quality of life like for a resident of the seven kingdoms? Sure, there’s the queen’s justice, but is there environmental justice? (spoiler- no) Walkability? Connectivity? Economic Opportunities? What’s the land use like of the capitals of the seven kingdoms? What are their food systems? How does each capital fare against domestic threats?

Cumulatively, I’ve done weeks and weeks of “research” (read: watching #DemThrones) and I’ve broken down the urban form of each of the most viewed castles of Westros in the series. I’m sticking to Westros for the sake of brevity, but maybe the kingdoms of Essos will be a future part two. All of these are feudal societies that include a hierarchy of power and ownership of lands.

The Scoring

  • Defense:
    • game-thrones-loot-train-attackHigh score— Dragon spitting fire on Lannister troops
      These are incredibly defensible, strategically-built castles or cities that can fairly easily withstand any attack. This scene is from season 7, the most recent season, where Dany flies her dragons nearest to Kings Landing to attack the Lannister troops for their attacks on her allies.
    • 200w_d (9)Medium— Jon Snow facing the cavalry
      These have pretty well-established defense mechanisms or positions. The castle or city is able to be defended from most attacks. This scene is from Season 6 when Jon Snow and other fellow northerners try to take Winterfell back from the horrible, awful, no good, very bad Boltons, who caused terror in the north when they occupied the castle.
    • 200w_d (3)Low Score— Baby dragon in chains
      These areas do not score well on defense because of their vulnerabilities to attack from the ground or sea. I used a baby dragon in chains to describe these places because while they may have some fortification, there is one huge weakness that allows them to be attacked.

 

  • Environment:
    • 200w_d 2High Score— Ellaria Sand strolling through gardens
      These are lush cities or castles with plenty of access to open space, decent stormwater management (for the time), and sanitary systems. I use this image to show how the beauty and access to nature as well as the deftly placed water features with implied impeccable stormwater best management practices (BMPs).
    • main-qimg-de9e30e2fd713e17224bfaf96fbce3f6Medium— Robb Stark in the Rain
      These cities are not quite as lush, but still have access to open space and greenery. They may have challenges with stormwater management because of the amount of impervious surface and/or their sanitary sewer system. I chose Robb Stark in the rain because, rain = stormwater and he represents the places that seem unbothered by the precipitation.
    • gallery-1500298978-sam-gagLow Score— Samwell Tarly dry heaving at his cleaning duties
      These are areas that are mostly bleak mud pits or stone without much in terms of greenery, stormwater management, or sanitary systems. Samwell is how I feel like all the residents of these places must feel on a sweltering day of Summer as the mud pit off-gases its odors into the village. Yeah, you get it.
  • Food System:
    • Cutting_pigeon_pie_at_Purple_WeddingHigh score— Joffrey Baratheon cutting his wedding pie
      These areas have a wealth of food security stemming from either self-grown or payments/yields from their hinterlands, or surrounding agricultural areas. In the case of most feudal systems, some portion of the farmers’ or other craftsperson’s’ yield goes to the lord. What better “let them eat cake” moment than the gluttony of a palace feast to exhibit food security.
    • 200w_d (7)Medium— Dany eating a heart
      These areas do not have as much access or security in food resources, but there always seems to be something they can scrape together, that is to say, it may not be the most choice cut of meat.
    • 200w_d (8)Low Score— Crowds in Essos reaching for a single slice of pizza
      These areas see a shortage of food and have high food insecurity leading to many of their poorest citizens being unsure of where their next meal will come from. This gem was not of my making, but found on giphy, but it’s awesome.
  • Transportation and Connectivity:
    • MV5BMTU1ODAyMzg1Nl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODUxOTIxOTE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1502,1000_AL_High score—Ominous strolls of Tyrion and Varys
      These areas are well connected both interior to their streets and areas as well as to the rest of Westros. In these places, one can make ominous plans for creating chaos no matter if it’s a game of pits or ladders.
    • 200w_dMedium— Septan leading the walk of Shame
      These areas are somewhat connected internally and to the surrounding areas and the rest of Westros, but may face challenges like rough terrain or unestablished roads if they need to reach a place in a small amount of time. I use this image because while the transportation infrastructure may be there, the journey may not be easy.
    • Targaryen-Fleet-6x10-7Low Score— Targaryen fleet sailing to Dragonstone
      These areas are relatively disconnected. They may be very insular and difficult to access by different modes of transportation. I use the Targaryen fleet sailing to show the lengths to which you may need to go to access these places, which are often not on mainland Westros.
  • Economy:
    • main-qimg-03579a1d2697cb0cc3ff435836c0bb73High score—Tyrell loot from the sacking of Highgarden
      These areas are rich in economic industry either directly paid (gold) or indirectly paid (goods and services). They are economically independent and can afford nice things.
    • Game-of-Thrones-season-4-premiere-Jaime-Lannisters-gold-handMedium— Jamie’s gold hand
      These areas are somewhat diverse in their economic offerings, but may be limited by climate or location. They are still able to get what they need but maybe won’t have the nicest dresses from the tailors of Kings Landing.
    • 1 HBO's  "Game of Thrones" season 2 Dany- Emilia Clarke Jorah- Ian Glen Kavaro-  Steven Cole Doreah-  Roxanne Mc Kee Xaro Xhaon Daxos-  Nonso AnonzieLow — The Empty Vault of Xaro Xhoan Doxas
    • These areas are out of money or do not have much, if any, economic power to be seen. This is especially the case after the castle or city has been overthrown or a feudal lord/lady has been killed.

 

 

Summary of Livability
In part 2 of this blog, I’ll provide more information, context, and nerddom to explain each scoring.

A comparison of each most-seen place in the television series, Game of Thrones, based on their defense, environment, transportation and connectivity, food system, and economy. The comparison and scoring is done using different images from the show that are explained within the scoring text.

 

(all Photos, except the pizza gif are from the HBO series)

Christine E. Mayeur, AICP is an urban planner with a unique set of skills and hobbies, interested in all things creative and challenging. Christine uses her history of working with communities through grassroots organizations along with her planning skills to help plan transportation systems and environmental solutions that meet the needs of all users.

Equitable Water

Realizing An Equitable Water Future

A few months ago, I had the opportunity to participate as a Peer Reviewer for the US Water Alliance’s report, An Equitable Water Future. The conversation amongst peers was rich, thoughtful and engaging and I am proud of the outcome of the report which explores the impacts of water management on disadvantaged communities, and the opportunities to build more equitable water systems. This is the most comprehensive briefing paper to date on the interconnections between water management and equity. The report identifies the ways in which water issues like affordability and aging infrastructure disproportionately impact vulnerable communities, and highlights the potential to leverage water systems to bring about greater opportunity for all. Through over 100 examples and in-depth case studies, the report spotlights the promising work being done around the country to ensure that all people have access to safe, clean water; benefit from water infrastructure investments; and are resilient in the face of a changing climate.

An Equitable Water Future provides a framework for all stakeholders to understand their role in making our water systems more inclusive. We hope that you will share the report with your networks! The full paper is available online here.

Take a read and let me know what you think.

Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC an environmental consulting, urban planning and public engagement firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.





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