Posts Tagged ‘Vision Zero’

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Vision Zero: Less Talk More Action

Crossing the street in the nation’s capital shouldn’t be a death sentence. Unfortunately, for far too many, it has become just that.

How many more people will be injured?

How many people will have to lose their life before we see real change?

When Nspiregreen led the development of the District’s Vision Zero Plan, I was excited about the opportunity to prioritize vulnerable users such asvzpedestrians, cyclists, and disabled individuals in transportation planning and engineering. What surprised me as I talked to hundreds of residents in all eight wards of the District was the number of people who had either been hit themselves or knew someone who had been hit by a car while crossing the street. I have definitely encountered my share of reckless and impatient drivers but listening to the experiences of others was both eye-opening and humbling. What I didn’t know then, is that I would witness an accident just as tragic.

By 9:00 am, I am usually in my office downtown; but, as the universe would have it on this bright and sunny morning, I was taking my son on a long walk to daycare from his morning Doctor’s appointment. We were crossing eastbound on the southside of 15th St. and H St. NW paying attention to the heavy traffic around us and people who like me just wanted to get to their destination. As soon as we crossed the street, I looked immediately to my left and saw a man jumping out of his truck. He was distressed and yelling something. My eyes went from him to the road in front of him and that’s where I saw the body of someone laying in the road. I immediately dialed 911. I wasn’t on that side of the street, but I knew it was bad because the person wasn’t moving. As the operator asked me what seemed like a million questions, I made my way across the street to see a woman lying there – Starbucks cups laying on the ground – with no movement. Things were happening so fast. There were some men assisting her and someone checked and discovered that she did have a pulse. There was blood and she wasn’t conscious. I couldn’t believe the scene unfolding before me. We were crossing the street at the same time (with the walk signal) but someone made a left turn and hit her. How did this happen? Why did this happen? Where in the hell are the police? The ambulance? My mind was racing. I was anxious. But mostly my thoughts were on her.

I stood around a while hoping that I would get some signal that she would be okay. By the time the paramedics arrived, I decided to get my son to daycare and come back. I was moving but I was so unsettled. Throughout the workday, my thoughts were with her. The next day I found out the unfortunate news that Mrs. Carol Tomason a wife, mother, grandmother and lifelong educator didn’t survive the hit. I can only imagine what was on Mrs. Tomason’s mind that morning – enjoying her vacation spending precious time with her children and grandchildren. Like many of us in the District she was looking forward to enjoying her coffee drink and getting on with her day. Unfortunately, she wouldn’t get to live out this day. Her family is now left to mourn her death caused by an accident that should have never happened.

This is only one of the regrettable stories of tragedy that have become all too common on DC streets. In her obituary, Mrs. Tomason’s family asked people to support DC Vision Zero. Without swift action and accountability, DC Vision Zero is just a plan with pretty graphics. We developed it with policies and enforcement mechanisms that should be implemented. It is a tool to address what has become all too common behavior in the District. There should be less talk about Vision Zero and its possibilities and more actions that prioritize the District’s most vulnerable users. While getting to zero may seem ambitious if everyone does their part it is attainable.

Update: As I write this blog, I was sent a link to Mayor Bowser’s new Vision Zero announcement. I won’t go into the details of the announcement here; but, I will say that I hope these new changes significantly reduce the number of tragedies that we have seen in the District.

 Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC a community, multimodal, and environmental planning firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.

 

http://www.pulseprotects.com/wp-content/uploads/dangers-of-speeding-500x350.jpg

The Need for Speed

GIF from the movie Top gun where two pilots are walking along an air field with planes in the background, one says "I feel the need, the need for speed" and they high five each other enthusiastically

Speed is everywhere for human beings. It’s in our music (Speed Playlist), our movies (Cars, Fast and Furious franchise), our TV shows, our sports, it influences what we buy (Fast Action!), how we eat (Fast Food, Fast Casual). Speed is often seen as a good thing, a selling point, a marketing tool. And I get it, speed is exciting, it’s an adrenaline rush. The need for speed is directly related to the one thing that humans can’t get more of- time. We don’t have time to waste these days. The faster we can get through the monotonous, the mundane, or even tasks or situations we want to be involved in, the more time we have for ourselves, with our families, friends, and doing things we enjoy.

The need to take risks and go fast in our cars is somewhat biological. That pesky dopamine is responsible for our motivation to take risks and accomplish something. Even if that something is as simple as getting to brunch on time even when you know your friends are always late.

But here’s the thing, when it comes to traffic safety, speed kills. The faster a person is driving a car when it strikes a person walking is directly proportional to whether the person who was walking goes home to their friends, family, cat, dog, goldfish or whatever.

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According to the principles of Vision Zero, speed is the most critical factor of safety. Slower vehicle speeds result in less severe crashes and increase the likelihood that a person be able to walk away from that crash. It may be frustrating when you are sitting in traffic when you’d rather be frolicking in a field of daisies or on a beach or at home, binging on Netflix in your comfy pants. As the saying goes, no loss of life is acceptable.

Vision Zero focuses on putting human life and health above all else with the belief that no one should be seriously injured or killed while wheeling, walking, biking, driving, or using transit to and from their destinations. Whatever the reason and whatever situation you are coming from or are in, we are all sharing the road and no one wants to be killed, injured, or kill someone else while just trying to get to where they need to go.

You can avoid speeding by:

  1. Give yourself more time. This is the DC metro region, home of some of THE WORST traffic congestion in the US. When planning your travel in the region, account for congestions and give yourself an extra half hour. If you get to your destination early, take a walk around or smell the flowers. This includes waking up earlier, mapping your route, checking the news and traffic or metro alerts before you go.
  2. Avoid feeling pressure to speed by other drivers. If you are moving slower, keep right. Just like riding a metro escalator- walk left, stand right. If you see a driver getting frustrated behind you, take a deep breath and smile, wave, or blow a kiss. As my husband likes to say “A lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine”. And it’s not a challenge to your man-/woman-hood if someone tries to pass you. In the words of New Edition, cool it down. 
  3. If you feel yourself getting frustrated, take a breath, try to relax. Deep breath in and out. Put on some classical music or light hearted music. The bus in front of you is carrying more people than you are, and its existence means less cars on the road. The person crossing the road is someone’s family, friend, and/or co-worker.
  4. Slow your mustang down. Be mindful of your speed as you are traveling. Residential areas and areas near schools, recreation centers, churches, senior centers, and other areas with lots of people walking around them are places to be especially alert.

Stay safe out there everyone!

 

Christine E. Mayeur is an urban planner with a unique set of skills and hobbies, interested in all things creative and challenging. Christine uses her history of working with communities through grassroots organizations along with her planning skills to help plan transportation systems and environmental solutions that meet the needs of all users.

Image of an evening shot in New York City looking at a pile of snow in the middle of a crosswalk with many sets of footsteps through it. There are people in the background on the other side of the street in winter clothing walking around.

Fair Weather Safety

Snow. Some people love it (ME!). Some people hate it (everyone else!). However, we can all agree that it presents some interesting results from a planner or engineer’s perspective. Planners love to point out the “sneckdowns” that occur to show all the underutilized roadway space that exists. They have their merits because they do serve to calm traffic and shorten crossing distances… that is, if you are physically able to cross the street.

No matter where I have lived in this region or others, urban or suburban, when we have snow storms, pedestrians are often not as well considered or prioritized as other modes. Roads are plowed, cycletracks are plowed (well, plowed enough), but sidewalks are often left subject to property owners’ discretion and shoveling prowess. There are a few problems with this kind of policy:

  1. Sidewalks can often become hazardous when it ices over if not shoveled and treated properly. If a sidewalk is not continuously and consistently shoveled and treated, icy patches can send someone to the hospital. I was especially conscious of this because after a certain point in pregnancy, any fall means a trip to the Emergency Room to check on the baby. These patches are equally as problematic for seniors and those with disabilities.
  2. Crosswalks are often impassable. Plows often pile up snow at the intersections and in many cases, this means near crosswalks and curb ramps. The snow then refreezes into an ice mountain. Crossing becomes impossible unless you can scale a 3’ snow mountain. I don’t know about you, but I don’t typically pack my ice climbing equipment on my way to work. Best case scenario, you try to climb Snow Mountain and your foot falls through what is actually slush and you end up with squishy, wet shoes all day. People in wheelchairs have an even worse time in these situations because crossing is just not an option.
  3. Pedestrians often must walk in the street. Since streets and roadways are a priority for plows, pedestrians often must resort to walking in the street because it is the only reliable place to walk where the likelihood is lower that you’ll slip and have an injury. This becomes a huge hazard especially with dark winter clothing, earlier sunsets during winter, and malfunctioning street lighting or lighting on timers. I’ve seen multiple people utilizing right turn pockets on busy roads to get past the intersection and rejoin the sidewalk where the plows have not piled up snow. Even worse, people have died in these cases
  4. Pedestrian refuges become precarious because they are often left unplowed or overcome with snow. This results in longer crossing distances and increased time needed to cross.

This becomes a Vision Zero issue because people can be seriously injured or killed in these situations. While this kind of safety may not be a nation-wide concern, in the Northeast and regions with heavy snow storms during the winter, it is a largely overlooked issue. It is a relatively easy fix as well. Training plow drivers and independent contractors to plow snow away from pedestrian crossings rather than into them. Attaching fines to those that do not comply. Agencies can also deploy smaller plows, snow blowers, or other equipment as they do for cycletracks or protected bike lanes to clear crosswalk ramps and pedestrian refuges. Depending on policies, these are generally in the public right of way, and would fall under the purview of municipal agencies. If not, the property owner on the corner should be responsible for ensuring at least the curb ramps are clear.

Bottom line is, transportation conditions impact choices and many people still need to travel to their jobs during or after a storm. If people can’t walk to the metro or bus stop, they may choose to drive or rideshare. For those that can’t drive as an option they make unsafe choices to walk in the street. For a region that is focused on reducing congestion and increasing safety, this is a relatively small change that could make a big difference in getting back to normal after a storm by focusing on all modes as they reconnect the transportation network. As a region we can look to other cities or federal guidance that experience more intensive storms to learn from them. I even came up with the initiative name: Vision ZerSnow and that one you can have for free.

 

Christine E. Mayeur is an urban planner with a unique set of skills and interests. She has been called a “renaissance woman” by her coworkers and is interested in all things creative and challenging. Christine uses her history of working with communities through grassroots organizations along with her planning skills to help plan transportation systems that meet the needs of all users. 





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