Posts Tagged ‘Water Quality’

Image from the TV show Game of Thrones with Milesandre, the red witch, looking into fire with the caption "The internet is dark and full of spoilers"

Thronesian Livability

Note: Please note there are spoilers here from Game of Thrones season 7, so if you aren’t caught up by now, beware! Also note that this information is solely based on the HBO show and not the books.

In the game of thrones, you win or you die… but what’s the quality of life like for a resident of the seven kingdoms? Sure, there’s the queen’s justice, but is there environmental justice? (spoiler- no) Walkability? Connectivity? Economic Opportunities? What’s the land use like of the capitals of the seven kingdoms? What are their food systems? How does each capital fare against domestic threats?

Cumulatively, I’ve done weeks and weeks of “research” (read: watching #DemThrones) and I’ve broken down the urban form of each of the most viewed castles of Westros in the series. I’m sticking to Westros for the sake of brevity, but maybe the kingdoms of Essos will be a future part two. All of these are feudal societies that include a hierarchy of power and ownership of lands.

The Scoring

  • Defense:
    • game-thrones-loot-train-attackHigh score— Dragon spitting fire on Lannister troops
      These are incredibly defensible, strategically-built castles or cities that can fairly easily withstand any attack. This scene is from season 7, the most recent season, where Dany flies her dragons nearest to Kings Landing to attack the Lannister troops for their attacks on her allies.
    • 200w_d (9)Medium— Jon Snow facing the cavalry
      These have pretty well-established defense mechanisms or positions. The castle or city is able to be defended from most attacks. This scene is from Season 6 when Jon Snow and other fellow northerners try to take Winterfell back from the horrible, awful, no good, very bad Boltons, who caused terror in the north when they occupied the castle.
    • 200w_d (3)Low Score— Baby dragon in chains
      These areas do not score well on defense because of their vulnerabilities to attack from the ground or sea. I used a baby dragon in chains to describe these places because while they may have some fortification, there is one huge weakness that allows them to be attacked.

 

  • Environment:
    • 200w_d 2High Score— Ellaria Sand strolling through gardens
      These are lush cities or castles with plenty of access to open space, decent stormwater management (for the time), and sanitary systems. I use this image to show how the beauty and access to nature as well as the deftly placed water features with implied impeccable stormwater best management practices (BMPs).
    • main-qimg-de9e30e2fd713e17224bfaf96fbce3f6Medium— Robb Stark in the Rain
      These cities are not quite as lush, but still have access to open space and greenery. They may have challenges with stormwater management because of the amount of impervious surface and/or their sanitary sewer system. I chose Robb Stark in the rain because, rain = stormwater and he represents the places that seem unbothered by the precipitation.
    • gallery-1500298978-sam-gagLow Score— Samwell Tarly dry heaving at his cleaning duties
      These are areas that are mostly bleak mud pits or stone without much in terms of greenery, stormwater management, or sanitary systems. Samwell is how I feel like all the residents of these places must feel on a sweltering day of Summer as the mud pit off-gases its odors into the village. Yeah, you get it.
  • Food System:
    • Cutting_pigeon_pie_at_Purple_WeddingHigh score— Joffrey Baratheon cutting his wedding pie
      These areas have a wealth of food security stemming from either self-grown or payments/yields from their hinterlands, or surrounding agricultural areas. In the case of most feudal systems, some portion of the farmers’ or other craftsperson’s’ yield goes to the lord. What better “let them eat cake” moment than the gluttony of a palace feast to exhibit food security.
    • 200w_d (7)Medium— Dany eating a heart
      These areas do not have as much access or security in food resources, but there always seems to be something they can scrape together, that is to say, it may not be the most choice cut of meat.
    • 200w_d (8)Low Score— Crowds in Essos reaching for a single slice of pizza
      These areas see a shortage of food and have high food insecurity leading to many of their poorest citizens being unsure of where their next meal will come from. This gem was not of my making, but found on giphy, but it’s awesome.
  • Transportation and Connectivity:
    • MV5BMTU1ODAyMzg1Nl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODUxOTIxOTE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1502,1000_AL_High score—Ominous strolls of Tyrion and Varys
      These areas are well connected both interior to their streets and areas as well as to the rest of Westros. In these places, one can make ominous plans for creating chaos no matter if it’s a game of pits or ladders.
    • 200w_dMedium— Septan leading the walk of Shame
      These areas are somewhat connected internally and to the surrounding areas and the rest of Westros, but may face challenges like rough terrain or unestablished roads if they need to reach a place in a small amount of time. I use this image because while the transportation infrastructure may be there, the journey may not be easy.
    • Targaryen-Fleet-6x10-7Low Score— Targaryen fleet sailing to Dragonstone
      These areas are relatively disconnected. They may be very insular and difficult to access by different modes of transportation. I use the Targaryen fleet sailing to show the lengths to which you may need to go to access these places, which are often not on mainland Westros.
  • Economy:
    • main-qimg-03579a1d2697cb0cc3ff435836c0bb73High score—Tyrell loot from the sacking of Highgarden
      These areas are rich in economic industry either directly paid (gold) or indirectly paid (goods and services). They are economically independent and can afford nice things.
    • Game-of-Thrones-season-4-premiere-Jaime-Lannisters-gold-handMedium— Jamie’s gold hand
      These areas are somewhat diverse in their economic offerings, but may be limited by climate or location. They are still able to get what they need but maybe won’t have the nicest dresses from the tailors of Kings Landing.
    • 1 HBO's  "Game of Thrones" season 2 Dany- Emilia Clarke Jorah- Ian Glen Kavaro-  Steven Cole Doreah-  Roxanne Mc Kee Xaro Xhaon Daxos-  Nonso AnonzieLow — The Empty Vault of Xaro Xhoan Doxas
    • These areas are out of money or do not have much, if any, economic power to be seen. This is especially the case after the castle or city has been overthrown or a feudal lord/lady has been killed.

 

 

Summary of Livability
In part 2 of this blog, I’ll provide more information, context, and nerddom to explain each scoring.

A comparison of each most-seen place in the television series, Game of Thrones, based on their defense, environment, transportation and connectivity, food system, and economy. The comparison and scoring is done using different images from the show that are explained within the scoring text.

 

(all Photos, except the pizza gif are from the HBO series)

Christine E. Mayeur, AICP is an urban planner with a unique set of skills and hobbies, interested in all things creative and challenging. Christine uses her history of working with communities through grassroots organizations along with her planning skills to help plan transportation systems and environmental solutions that meet the needs of all users.

Equitable Water

Realizing An Equitable Water Future

A few months ago, I had the opportunity to participate as a Peer Reviewer for the US Water Alliance’s report, An Equitable Water Future. The conversation amongst peers was rich, thoughtful and engaging and I am proud of the outcome of the report which explores the impacts of water management on disadvantaged communities, and the opportunities to build more equitable water systems. This is the most comprehensive briefing paper to date on the interconnections between water management and equity. The report identifies the ways in which water issues like affordability and aging infrastructure disproportionately impact vulnerable communities, and highlights the potential to leverage water systems to bring about greater opportunity for all. Through over 100 examples and in-depth case studies, the report spotlights the promising work being done around the country to ensure that all people have access to safe, clean water; benefit from water infrastructure investments; and are resilient in the face of a changing climate.

An Equitable Water Future provides a framework for all stakeholders to understand their role in making our water systems more inclusive. We hope that you will share the report with your networks! The full paper is available online here.

Take a read and let me know what you think.

Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC an environmental consulting, urban planning and public engagement firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.

world-water-day

The Thirst Is Real

world-water-day

A water drop. Copyright: Michael Melgar, license: GNU FDL

After a long day at work, a good workout at the gym, or just a walk in the sizzling summer sun our personal need for water is even greater. Imagine turning on the faucet and tap-tap there is nothing there or that water coming from the faucet isn’t safe to drink. There is no bottled water to get you by, no water fountain to fill the gap. Water, like the air we breathe, is a precious natural resource. It is necessary to sustain life and, although it covers much of the earth, is also in short supply for those that need it most. According to a United Nations Report, 783 million people lack access to clean water and almost 2.5 billion do not have access to adequate sanitation. Take a second to imagine that situation: no water to drink, bathe in, cook with, or use for luxury purposes like washing the car or watering the lawn. Water quality and quantity are a global challenge.

Water issues are everywhere. Even in a country like the United States, where we seem to take water for granted, there are people who lack access to clean water due to lack of infrastructure and pollution. These issues are even more pervasive in developing nations and areas where there are population explosions. The already inadequate infrastructure cannot keep up with the demands on the system. Water pollution abounds from agricultural, human, and industrial sources. We have seen these examples in communities in Michigan, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas to name a few. In addition to water quality, climate change adds to an ever-increasing water scarcity by causing water to evaporate more quickly.

Human thirst for water is real and so must be the solutions to combat this crisis. Because there is a limited supply, we must focus on having clean sources of water. No one should lack access to clean water. There are actions that we can take individually such as conserving water and reducing our own pollution; but, there are other actions that take a collective broader approach. These actions can include:

  • finding ways to decrease agricultural runoff to reduce sediment, bacteria, fertilizers, and pesticides in waterways;
  • water reuse such as gray water systems;
  • combatting climate change to deal with scarcity issues;
  • using pollution prevention methods and technologies to decrease contamination from industrial sources;
  • sustainable development, which includes low impact development and green infrastructure;
  • and building infrastructure in new places as well as rebuilding crumbling infrastructure.

Until we stand firm and act, hold our representatives responsible, and advocate for clean water at all levels of government, we will witness the devastating consequences of clean water scarcity including disease and death of millions of humans as well as fish and wildlife, rampant hunger, and incidents that impact our security. A few weeks ago, we celebrated World Water Day but our commitment to preserving this natural resource should be daily.


Chanceé Lundy Russell is the Co-Founder of Nspiregreen LLC an environmental consulting, urban planning and public engagement firm based in Washington, DC. The Selma, Alabama native received her BS in Environmental Science from Alabama A&M University and her MS in Civil Engineering from Florida State University. She is passionate about environmental justice issues and works to create healthy, livable communities for all.





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